Archives

Do you know about the COVID-19 Restrictions in Maternity Services?

Maternity services in Ireland should matter, please get involved and show your support.


NCCWN Donegal Women’s Network as a project of The National Collective of Community based Women’s Networks (NCCWN) are calling on the Government to ease COVID-19 restrictions in maternity services and allow birthing partners to support pregnant people and be present at all pregnancy related appointments, scans, full labour and birth as soon as possible.

As part of this call, we are also asking members of the public to let Government representatives know that you are not happy with the current measures or treatment of pregnant people and you want restrictions in maternity services to ease.

To make it as easy as possible for you to contact your local TD we have drafted a letter you can use to express your concerns and support every pregnant person across the country. You can find who your local TD is and how they can be contacted at: https://www.whoismytd.com/.

If you are part of a women’s group and would like to draft your own letter, please feel free to contact your nearest NCCWN project for support. You can find where all of our projects are located here. Or, if you would like your nearest project to send the letter on your behalf please contact us and let us know. Your personal details will only be used for this campaign unless you indicate that you want us to retain your details.

Download the letter template

The Health impact of Covid-19 on Women in Donegal

1

 

The NCCWN Donegal Women’s Network Covid-19 impact survey reveals that, 61.1% of women living in Donegal feel that their mental health has been impacted by Covid-19. This percentage increased to 78% for women within the 18-25 age group and 70% for women between 26-40 years of age. While women living in the Buncrana Electoral Area had the highest percentage at 68% and 68.6% of women with a civil status of living with a partner had the highest percentage for any civil status category.

 


When asked since Covid-19 how much time have you had to look after your own mental health and wellbeing? 36.7% of Women stated that they had less time. This increased to 46% for women in the 26-40 years’ age category, 49% for women living in the Buncrana Electoral Area and 50% for women living with a partner.

4

 


It is clear the Covid-19 pandemic has created and highlighted additional stresses for women in Donegal.  Women who took part in our impact survey talked about a number of issues and challenges they have faced since March due to the pandemic, these include;

Dealing with Post Traumatic Stress with Covid-19 restrictions re-triggering past traumatic experiences, going through pregnancy during the pandemic, dealing with ongoing health issues while trying to stay safe through the pandemic.

Some of the most common themes raised by women which directly impacted their mental health related to childcare and work. Many women talked about the additional workload and the challenge of balancing working from home and childcare, expectations.  Many highlighted even with a partner or husband in the house it still fell on them to be responsible for childcare. Homeschooling was a particular issue raised by women, who stated many had experienced an assumption by their partner that it would be them who would look after homeschooling. Which was a cause of frustration for women.

Many highlighted experiencing feelings of anxiety, isolation and loneliness. With constant worrying and isolation leading to sleep issues. Being away from friends and family also contributing to this. For others stress and anxiety was being brought on by worrying about the uncertainty of the future, finances and how they were going to pay bills if no work continued because of Covid-19.

While there were, additional stresses brought about from a feeling of expectation that with more free time now you should be doing stuff and being active at home all the time when in reality you’re just trying to cope with getting through the day.

A number of women who were front-line workers also expressed that their mental health was being impacted by a lack of support from their employers in relation to new workloads, personal safety and proper communication during the last few months.


This is just a snapshot of the data we received from 832 women living across Donegal. We will continue to analysis all the data and share our findings and recommendations in the Autumn.

Finding positivity during life’s hardest times

jen

How do you find positivity during a life changing event? In this Women’s Live’s, Women’s Voice’ feature Jen shares her story and journey of working through a traumatic loss, to engaging in a new personal venture and raising awareness for victims of domestic violence.

 


Here’s my story. It isn’t always a happy one but I hope you can see, as I did, that there are still glimmers of hope to be found during the darkest hours of our lives. My journey to this moment started at Christmas 2018. You see I now find my life has split into parts. Before what happened and after. Back then I had just made the decision to return home after spending a few years living and working in Spain. I had an amazing time while I was there and I am so glad to have had the opportunity to meet all the wonderful people and make all the fantastic memories that I did.

The reason I moved home was that my partner and I were expecting our first child and we decided that we wanted to live close to family so moving home was an easy decision. When I came back home I was around 7 months pregnant and eagerly awaiting the new arrival. Christmas came and went and I was adjusting to my life back in Ireland.


 

Everything changed on 4th January 2019. I think we often float through life thinking we are invincible and nothing shocking or devastating is ever going to affect us. It’s not an easy thing to write or for that matter read but my sister Jasmine was murdered.

Now I’m sure we have all heard about the stages of grief. Probably from the hundreds of Hollywood movies that like to portray this process over and over again. To be honest I am not sure it works in the way in which it has been made out to.

I think when something this life altering happens you never really make your way through all the so called “stages”. The shock of what had happened is something that our family will never be able to fathom and neither our community or country for that matter. But in terms of my own personal story I was in a serious state of shock and at this point 8 months pregnant.

I think that one of the main things that helped me and everyone around me during this time was the fact that I was pregnant. The fact that I had to stay calm and focus on the baby. And that’s what we did.


 

The next 6 or 7 weeks were an absolute blur. During this time one of my sister’s beautiful children came to live with me. I had never in a million years imagined that I would become a mother to a toddler all the while pregnant for the first time. My entire life had changed.

Then on the 21st of February almost 2 weeks later than he was supposed to and on the day after my sister Jasmine’s birthday, my son arrived. It was another whirlwind. I guess he was quite content not coming into the world just yet and in the end, I had to have an emergency cesarean.

So now I was really on another planet. I had gone from living an easy life teaching English in Spain to dealing with trauma and grief, becoming a mother to 2 kids and recovering from a major surgery. I don’t know how but I just kept on living my life even though I was dealing with all the stress that was constantly being thrown at myself and my family.


 

When the fog of our lives started to lift a bit, my mother and I decided that we wanted to start a social media page in order to keep people thinking about my sister and to help keep her memory alive. We started SmileForJasmine and received a huge response from the public which was amazing. We have continued with the page and have organised many events since raising funds for various charities in my sisters memory.

I realised while we were thinking of ideas and posting to the page that it made me feel good. Or distracted me at least. I needed something of my own. Something that could draw me away from thinking about everything going on in my life, something positive. So, I thought about it. What makes me happy? Simple. The kids. That little girl becoming my daughter and my son being born were two of the main things that got me through everything. Once I knew the subject I had to figure out what the actual idea was…


 

It happened like this. I woke up one morning and it was there in my mind. IrishMamaBuys. I don’t know how it got there but it’s one of those moments when you dream or wake up with a really good idea and usually you just think “Hey that’s a great thought” and then fall back asleep. But this time that wasn’t the case. I thought some more and decided that I was going to start my very own “Mum Blog” with a focus on product reviews and tips from my own experience as a mum.

On that very day, I set up my website, my Facebook and my Instagram and the rest as they say is history. I started up in August last year and it has been one of the best things I’ve ever done. It has given me so much. The distraction as I previously mentioned is a wonderful thing to have, it’s a way of keeping my brain focused, I love the satisfaction of helping other people, the chance to talk to other like-minded women, a way of venting my feelings and a great sense of achievement.

82490384_169964374348928_7614060517031673856_oMy life will never be the same. I have had to find ways to move forward. IrishMamaBuys has been a huge part of this. I don’t know where the journey with it will lead or who I might meet along the way and that’s ok. I hope that people who are part of my little IrishMamaBuys world get something positive from it too. Maybe they get some help with something as simple as what bib to buy, perhaps they get chatting to other women about everyday challenges mums face or maybe they even get inspired to create their own blog or business.

Whatever it is I am grateful. Grateful to everyone who has helped me grow and share my little passion project. I hope you can understand now how much my “mum blog” really does mean to me.


 

If you or any one you know have been effected by domestic violence or need to seek advise you can find support with the following organisations-

 

 


NCCWN Donegal are always looking for women to share their stories and looking for women to write features on topics of their choice which we will profile as part of our Women’s Lives, Women’s Voices’ series.

Compassionate Women Group Course

Network Compassionate Women

“Women, tend to spend a lot of time caring for others and often forget to extend that same care and love to themselves. Self-compassion is giving ourselves the same kindness, care, and understanding that we offer to others. Developing self-compassion can give us an emotional resilience that leaves us better able to deal with life’s challenges.”

Sara Anderson


NCCWN Donegal Women’s Network are pleased to be taking bookings for the New Compassionate Women course by Life Coach Sara Anderson. This is a FREE 4-week online group course which is being offered on a voluntary basic by Sara and will start on Wednesday 3rd June 11am-12.30pm. The aim of this course is to support women in their health and wellness, promoting personal development, well-being and positive mental health. Over the four weeks’ participants will be introduced to and learn about self-compassion, its importance for wellness and how you can develop it.

 

Through guided practice participants will learn mindfulness, empathy, and gratitude techniques allowing you to develop the tools and methods that will leave you feeling better about yourself and the world around you.

 

Venue: Online via Zoom

Dates: Wednesday 3rd, 10th, 17th and 24th June

Time: 11.00am-12.30pm

 

If you are interested in participating in this programme please fill in our online form here and someone will be in contact with you. For further information please contact NCCWN Donegal Women’s Network by email on donegalwomensnetwork@gmail.com. Booking is essential, book early to avoid disappointment.


 

The Compassionate Women group course is designed and facilitated by Sara Anderson, who has a working history and experience of working with groups and vast training experience in life coaching, drama therapy, mediation, mindfulness and many other modalities. She can be found on facebook @saratappingcoach or by mobile on 087 7189 620